Targeted Populations

Workforce Boards play an important role in connecting individuals with barriers to financially sustainable career pathway employment. The work that Workforce Boards do in serving individuals with disabilities, English language learners, ex-offenders, Veterans and those trying to combat the vicious cycle of family poverty is important not only to those who receive services. Serving these populations is essential to the continued vitality of our economy. Limits to these populations’ access to the skills needed by business has led to an artificial barrier to the talents of a large segment of the population. Likewise, that limitation leads to decreased spending power for these populations to be able to purchase goods and services produced by American businesses. It is in the best interest of all of us, whether a business-owner, a member of these populations, or otherwise, that every person has access to the skills that lead to their own individual prosperity, which helps to deepen the prosperity of the nation as a whole.

Here are some stories of how Workforce Boards utilize business-led strategies to ensure prosperity for those who are members of these targeted population groups.

Communications Details

Monday, January 23, 2017 through Friday, January 27, 2017

Examples

Tweets
Use the hashtag #wkdevweek whenever you tweet on the topic.

Sample tweets:

  • Did you know, only 17.5 percent of persons with a disability were employed (2015)? Get connected. (Your website or American Job Center location info) #wkdevweek
  • Did you know, the unemployment rate for those with disabilities is more than 2X than those without? (Your website or American Job Center location info) #wkdevweek
  • Did you know those with a disability tend to be older than the rest? Yet older workers need work too! Get connected. (Your website or American Job Center location info) #wkdevweek
  • Did you know, that over 50 million people are on some type of public assistance? Help them get good jobs. (Your website or American Job Center location info) #wkdevweek
  • Did you know, that more than 1 in 5 people in the U.S. are on some type of public assistance? Help them get good jobs. (Your website or American Job Center location info) #wkdevweek
  • Did you know 4 of 10 unemployed individuals rely on public assistance? Help them get good jobs. (Your website or American Job Center location info) #wkdevweek
  • Did you know, Over 10,000 ex-prisoners are released from America’s prisons every week? Let’s get them jobs! (Your website or American Job Center location info) #wkdevweek
  • The U S represents about 4.4 % of the world’s population, yet it houses 22 % of the world’s prisoners? They will need jobs. (Your website or American Job Center location info) #wkdevweek
  • Those who are given a second chance may be your best employees. Tap into great talent. (Your website or American Job Center location info) #wkdevweek
  • Did you know, about 33% of Gulf War-era II veterans reported having a service-connected disability? Let’s get them jobs! (Your website or American Job Center location info) #wkdevweek
  • Did you know that despite national efforts, vets have trouble finding and keeping jobs? We can help. (Your website or American Job Center location info) #wkdevweek
  • Companies find disciplined employees among veteran workforce. Get in the game. (Your website or American Job Center location info) #wkdevweek

Press Releases
In the world of social media Tweets, Facebook posts, and photo captions that are posted to Twitter and Facebook, there still exists a need for the press release – or news release, if you’re also sharing it with broadcast news outlets.
Your news announcement should be concise, fact-filled, and easy for editors and reporters to read and utilize. At the very least, it needs to answer: Who, What, Where, When, How, and Why?. To increase your chances of having it used, think of it as a package:

  • Keep it to one page when possible
  • Quote must be one a person would actually say (not extra text with quotes around it)
  • Utilize links to include a photo
  • Utilize URLs (website address) to draw the editor or reporter to key information
  • Avoid attachments (many news organization email systems treat as spam)
  • Use Associated Press Style, if you know it, and if you don’t, simply stick to clear writing.

Events
If you are holding an event that assists a targeted population, be sure to tweet about it!

Facts and Figures

Veterans

  • The unemployment rate for veterans who served on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces at any time since September 2001–a group referred to as Gulf War-era II veterans–declined by 1.4 percentage points over the year to 5.8 percent in 2015. The jobless rate for all veterans, at 4.6 percent, also declined from a year earlier
  • About 33 percent of Gulf War-era II veterans reported having a service-connected disability in August 2015, compared with 20 percent of all veterans
  • The unemployment rate for male veterans overall was lower than the rate for female veterans in 2015. The unemployment rate for male veterans declined to 4.5 percent. The rate for female veterans changed little at 5.4 percent

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Individuals with Disabilities

  • According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2015, 17.5 percent of persons with a disability were employed. In contrast, the employment-population ratio for those without a disability was 65 percent. The unemployment rate for persons with a disability fell to 10.7 percent in 2015, and the rate for those without a disability declined to 5.1 percent
  • In 2015, 32 percent of workers with a disability were employed part time, compared with 18 percent for those with no disability.
  • Workers with a disability were more likely to be self-employed than those with no disability.
  • Persons with a disability tend to be older than persons with no disability, reflecting the increased incidence of disability with age. In 2015, 47 percent of persons with a disability were age 65 and over, compared with 15 percent of those with no disability. Women were somewhat more likely to have a disability than men, and Blacks and Whites continued to have a higher prevalence of disability than Hispanics and Asians in 2015.
  • Workers with a disability were less likely to have an advanced degree than those with no disability (27.1% to 77.9%)
  • Persons with a disability are more likely to be in service occupations (21.7% to 17.2%), as well as Production, Transportation, and Material Moving occupations (14.4% to 11.8%).

Source: Current Population Survey, a monthly survey of about 60,000 households that provides statistics on employment and unemployment in the United States. The collection of data on persons with a disability is sponsored by the Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy.

Ex-Offenders

  • Over 10,000 ex-prisoners are released from America’s state and federal prisons every week and arrive on the doorsteps of our nation’s communities. More than 650,000 ex-offenders are released from prison every year, and studies show that approximately two-thirds will likely be rearrested within three years of release.
  • Source: U.S. Department of Justice

  • Adult correctional systems supervised an estimated 6,851,000 persons at yearend 2014, about 52,200 fewer offenders than at yearend 2013 but still a very high number of individuals.
    Bureau of Justice Statistics – Correctional Populations in the United States, 2014
  • In October 2013, the incarceration rate of the United States of America was the highest in the world, at 716 per 100,000 of the national population. While the United States represents about 4.4 percent of the world’s population, it houses around 22 percent of the world’s prisoners

Source: Roy Walmsley (November 21, 2013). World Prison Population List (tenth edition). International Centre for Prison Studies. Retrieved July 11, 2014.

Individuals on Public Assistance

  • GENERAL: In 2012, approximately 52.2 million people, or 21.3% of the population, participated in one or more major means-tested assistance programs, on average, each month. “Means-tested programs” are those where income, or financial need, is a qualifier. These programs include Medicaid, SNAP (food stamps), TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families), SSI (Supplemental Security Income), public or subsidized housing, and WIC (Women, Infants, and Children).
  • EDUCATION: During an average month in 2012, 37.3% of people who did not graduate from high school received means-tested benefits, compared with 21.6% of high school graduates and 9.6% of individuals with 1 or more years of college.
  • LABOR FORCE: For people 18 years and older, 33.5% of the unemployed received means-tested benefits in an average month of 2012, compared with 25.3% of those not in the labor force, 17.6% of part-time workers, and 6.7% of full-time workers.
  • About 4 out of 10 unemployed adults participated in means-tested programs for at least 1 month of 2012, in contrast with about 1 out of 10 full-time workers.
  • POVERTY: Among those with family income-to-poverty ratios under 1.00, the average participation rate for at least one type of major means-tested benefit was 61.3% in 2012, compared with 13.1% for those with family income-to-poverty ratios of 1.00 and over.
  • AGE: Children under 18 years of age were more likely to receive means-tested benefits than those aged 18 to 64 and those 65 years and older. In an average month during 2012, 39.2% of children received some type of means-tested benefit, compared with 16.6% of people aged 18 to 64 and 12.6% of people 65 years and older.
  • RACE / ETHNICITY: In 2012, the average monthly participation rate for Blacks, 41.6%, was higher than that of Asians or Pacific Islanders (17.8%) and non-Hispanic Whites (13.2%).
  • In 2012, the average monthly participation rate for Hispanics (36.4%) was higher than that of non-Hispanic Whites (13.2%).

Reports

Participating Organizations

  • Workforce Development Council – Conference of Mayors
  • California Workforce Association

To add your group to this list, please click here to submit your organization’s name.

CWA Events

Mar 01

Partnerships That Unlock Social Mobility – Ventura

March 1 @ 9:00 am - 2:00 pm
Poinsettia Pavilion Ventura CA United States
Mar 02

Partnerships That Unlock Social Mobility – LAX

March 2 @ 9:00 am - 2:00 pm
Los Angeles Airport Marriott Los Angeles CA United States
Mar 03

Day at the Capitol 2017 Prep Call

March 3 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mar 03

Day at the Capitol 2017 Prep Call

March 3 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Mar 06

Partnerships That Unlock Social Mobility – Central Coast

March 6 @ 9:00 am - 2:00 pm
Monterey Marriott Monterey CA United States

CWA Business

Mar 15

Capacity Building Committee Call

March 15 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Mar 16

Opportunities Committee Call

March 16 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Mar 21

Legislative Committee Call

March 21 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Mar 23

Executive Committee Call

March 23 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Apr 12

Capacity Building Committee Call

April 12 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Other Workforce Events

Mar 03

Day at the Capitol 2017 Prep Call

March 3 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mar 03
Mar 06

Day at the Capitol 2017 Prep Call

March 6 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Mar 06